Course Descriptions

This page is a comprehensive listing of our psychological sciences courses, combining:

  • Area categorization from the psychological sciences plan of study.
  • Prerequisites and course descriptions from the Undergraduate Catalog.
  • Information on when courses are typically offered at each campus. “Terms typically offered” is largely based on past course schedules, which may be helpful for determining when a course is likely to be offered in the future. However, this planning tool should be used with caution. Due to the many factors taken into consideration when creating the course schedule, future course schedules may bear little resemblance to historical offerings. Lastly, please note that psychological sciences does not typically offer courses during Winter Intersession.
  • Instructor-specific course descriptions. Instructor-specific course descriptions are intended to give a preview of the course syllabus and are subject to change without notice. Thus, the information outlined in the syllabus distributed to enrolled students may differ from the instructor-specific course description provided here. However, the course will always stay true to the official course description listed in the Undergraduate Catalog.

Accuracy is not guaranteed, and content is subject to change without notice.

1100. General Psychology I

Introduction

(132) Three credits. Two class periods and one 1-hour demonstration discussion. Ordinarily this course should be taken in the fall semester.

Basic principles that underlie mental processes and behavior; research methodology, biopsychology, sensation, perception, learning, memory and language. CA 3.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Fall, Spring Summer (SS1, SS2)
Avery Point Fall, Spring Varies
Hartford Fall, Spring Summer (SS1)
Stamford Fall, Spring Summer (SS1)
Waterbury Fall, Spring Summer (SS1)

Robert Astur (Waterbury)

This course will introduce students to experimental psychology using a natural science perspective, which emphasizes using the scientific method to advance our theories on human behavior. Topics to be covered will include research methodology, the nervous system, sensation and perception, learning and memory, language, emotions, and motivation. We also will discuss and analyze how psychology experiments and “facts” are presented within the modern media.

  • Format: Lecture
  • Requirements: 4 multiple-choice exams; experimental participation; short lab papers
  • Text/Materials: Psychology (David Myers), Worth Publishers.

James Chrobak (Storrs)

An introduction to psychology as a biological science with emphases on methodology (how to do science) and epistemology (how to understand/question the limits and validity of “scientific information”). Areas of study include interrelated topics in evolutionary psychology, cognitive psychology, psychopharmacology, and systems neuroscience. special emphasis is placed on how the biology of “mind” relates to contemporary issues in mental health, lifestyle choice, and public policy.

  • Format: 2 multimedia lectures per week; 1 lab per week
  • Requirements: Multiple-choice exams; additional, variable lab requirement; experimental participation
  • Text/Materials: Psychology (Peter Gray), Worth Publishers: 4th Ed.

Tehran Davis (Storrs)

This course will provide a broad introduction to psychology as a scientific endeavor, from the history of the field and its major advances, to the latest research on topics such as neurobiology and genetic influences, perception and action, memory, learning, intelligence, language, and reasoning. Seminal investigations in each of these areas will be covered, with an emphasis on the tools and methods used to investigate brain, behavior, and “mind.”

  • Format: Interactive lecture and in-class exercises twice per week; 1 lab per week
  • Requirements: 3 exams; class participation and exercises
  • Text/Materials: 1 textbook; 1 supplementary text; classroom response system using smart devices (phone, tablet, laptop)

Jamie Kleinman (Avery Point)

In this course students will develop an understanding of current theory and empirical research regarding psychology as a natural science. They will explore how psychologists gather knowledge about behavior and mental processes and draw conclusions based on research studies involving both animals and humans. The focus of this course will be on the genetic and neurological basis of these functions as related to sensation, perception, consciousness, learning, and memory. Students will be encouraged to develop critical thinking, analytical abilities and the articulation of ideas in both written and oral form.

  • Format: Prezi lectures; videos; small and large group discussion; in-class participation exercises
  • Requirements: 3 exams; class participation exercises
  • Text/Materials: 1 textbook; supplemental readings

Eric Lundquist (Storrs)

No course description available.

David B. Miller (Storrs)

An introduction to psychology as a natural science, with emphasis on its biological foundations. Psychological research methodology, theoretical and conceptual issues, history, and representative observational and experimental findings involving human and nonhuman organisms will be discussed in relation to the following areas: behavior genetics, neuroanatomy/physiology, exocrine and endocrine systems, sensation and perception, and learning.

  • Format: 2 computerized, multimedia lectures per week; 1 Macintosh computer lab per week
  • Requirements: 3 exams; additional, variable lab requirement (e.g., brief lab reports or short papers); experimental participation
  • Text/Materials: Student Manual

John Salamone (Storrs)

This course provides an overview of the scientific study of psychology. The behavior of human and non-human organisms is discussed in a variety of contexts, ranging from animal behavior and conditioning to the more complex and integrative processes characteristic of human cognition.

  • Format: 2 lectures per week; 1 lab per week
  • Requirements: 3 exams, lab reports
  • Text/Materials: Text; lab manual

Jerome Sehulster (Stamford)

No course description available.

Harvey Swadlow (Storrs)

No course description available.

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1101. General Psychology II

Introduction

(133) Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 1100. Not open for credit to students who have passed PSYC 1103. May not be taken concurrently with PSYC 1103.

Psychology as a social science. Research methodology, developmental, personality, clinical, abnormal and social psychology. CA 2.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Fall, Spring Summer
Avery Point Fall, Spring Varies
Hartford Fall, Spring Summer (SS2)
Stamford Fall, Spring Summer (SS2)
Waterbury Fall, Spring Not typically offered

Jamie Kleinman (Avery Point)

In this course students will develop an understanding of current theory and empirical research regarding psychology as a social science. They will explore how psychologists gather knowledge about behavior and mental processes and draw conclusions based on research studies involving humans. The focus of this course will be on three main areas; development through the lifespan, humans as social and cultural beings, and abnormal functioning and mental illness. Students will be encouraged to develop critical thinking, analytical abilities and the articulation of ideas in both written and oral form.

  • Format: Prezi lectures; videos; small and large group discussion; in-class participation exercises
  • Requirements: 3 exams; class participation exercises
  • Text/Materials: 1 textbook; supplemental readings

Kerry Marsh (Hartford)

Introduction to basic theory, research, and application of psychology in three areas: developmental/child psychology, clinical/abnormal psychology, and social/cognitive psychology. The course is designed to provide a framework for students interested in taking more advanced coursework in developmental, clinical, and social psychology. Special emphasis is placed on the role of culture on psychological development and experiences.

  • Format: Lecture
  • Requirements: 3 exams; short insight papers; in-class exercises or homework; participation in experiments
  • Text/Materials: 1 textbook

Jerome Sehulster (Stamford)

No course description available.

Kimberli Treadwell (Waterbury)

Introduction to basic theory, research, and application of psychology in three areas: developmental/child psychology, clinical/abnormal psychology, and social/cognitive psychology. The course is designed to provide a framework for students interested in taking more advanced coursework in developmental, clinical, and social psychology. Special emphasis is placed on the role of culture on psychological development and experiences.

  • Format: Lecture; group and individual exercises; interaction with i>clicker response technology
  • Requirements: In-class participation; 3 exams. Service learning component and paper on rotational basis.
  • Text/Materials: Meyer, D. Exploring Psychology (current edition); i>clicker

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1103. General Psychology II (Enhanced)

Introduction

(135) Four credits. Three lecture periods and one 1-hour discussion section. Prerequisite: PSYC 1100. Not open for credit to students who have passed PSYC 1101. May not be taken concurrently with PSYC 1101.

Psychology as a social science. Research methodology, developmental, personality, clinical, abnormal and social psychology. Applications of theory, writing, and demonstrations during discussion periods. CA 2.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Fall, Spring Not typically offered
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Stamford Spring Not typically offered
Waterbury Not typically offered Not typically offered

James Dixon (Storrs)

Introduction to basic theory, research, and application of psychology in three areas: developmental/child psychology, clinical/abnormal psychology, and social/cognitive psychology. The course is design to provide a framework for students interested in taking more advanced coursework in developmental, clinical, and social psychology. Special emphasis is placed on the role of culture on psychological development and experiences. The course also includes weekly discussion labs where students are exposed to psychological issues and research in an interactive setting.

  • Format: Lecture; 1 discussion section per week
  • Requirements: 3 exams; discussion group participation with 3 short insight papers; experimental participation
  • Text/Materials: Textbook

Colin Leach (Storrs)

Introduction to basic theory, research, and application of psychology in three areas: developmental/child psychology, clinical/abnormal psychology, and social/cognitive psychology. The course is design to provide a framework for students interested in taking more advanced coursework in developmental, clinical, and social psychology. Special emphasis is placed on the role of culture on psychological development and experiences. The course also includes weekly discussion labs where students are exposed to psychological issues and research in an interactive setting.

  • Format: Lecture; 1 discussion section per week
  • Requirements: 3 exams; discussion group participation with 3 short insight papers; experimental participation
  • Text/Materials: Textbook

Jerome Sehulster (Stamford)

No course description available.

Rhiannon Smith (Storrs)

Introduction to basic theory, research, and application of psychology in three areas: developmental/child psychology, clinical/abnormal psychology, and social/cognitive psychology. The course is design to provide a framework for students interested in taking more advanced coursework in developmental, clinical, and social psychology. Special emphasis is placed on the role of culture on psychological development and experiences. The course also includes weekly discussion labs where students are exposed to psychological issues and research in an interactive setting.

  • Format: Lecture; 1 discussion section per week
  • Requirements: 3 exams; discussion group participation with 3 short insight papers; experimental participation
  • Text/Materials: Textbook

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2100Q. Principles of Research in Psychology

Foundation

(202Q) Four credits. Three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory/discussion. Prerequisite: PSYC 1100, and 1101 or 1103 and STAT 1000 or 1100 (or Statistics Q 1000-level).

Design, analysis, and reporting of psychological research. Experimental and quasi-experimental designs, laboratory and correlational techniques, research ethics.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Not typically offered Not typically offered
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Stamford Fall Not typically offered
Waterbury Varies Not typically offered

Jerome Sehulster (Stamford)

No course description available.

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2100WQ. Principles of Research in Psychology

Foundation

(202WQ) Four credits. Three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory/discussion. Prerequisite: PSYC 1100, and 1101 or 1103 and STAT 1000 or 1100 (or Statistics Q 1000-level); ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

Design, analysis, and reporting of psychological research. Experimental and quasi-experimental designs, laboratory and correlational techniques, research ethics.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Fall, Spring Summer (AS1)
Avery Point Spring Not typically offered
Hartford Fall, Spring Not typically offered
Stamford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Waterbury Varies Not typically offered

Robert Astur (Waterbury)

The primary goal of research in psychology is to generate new insights into human behavior. The course provides first-hand experience in all phases of research: the development of a hypothesis, design of research, statistical analysis of data, and interpretation of results. Instruction is given in the various research strategies, statistics, measurement of behavior and ethics in research. The culmination of the course is the planning and presentation of an independent research project.

  • Format: Lecture with discussion; laboratory
  • Requirements: Exams; independent research project and presentation; homework; APA-style paper
  • Text/Materials: 2 texts; lab manual; calculator

Hart Blanton (Storrs)

The primary goal of research in psychology is to generate new insights into human behavior. The course provides first-hand experience in all phases of research: the development of a hypothesis, design of research, statistical analysis of data, and interpretation of results. Instruction is given in the various research strategies, statistics, measurement of behavior and ethics in research. The culmination of the course is the planning and presentation of an independent research project.

  • Format: Lecture; 1 lab per week
  • Requirements: Exams; independent research project and presentation
  • Text/Materials: 2 texts; lab manual; calculator

Chi-Ming Chen (Storrs)

The primary goal of research in psychology is to generate new insights into human behavior. The course provides first-hand experience in all phases of research: the development of a hypothesis, design of research, statistical analysis of data, and interpretation of results. Instruction is given in the various research strategies, statistics, measurement of behavior, and ethics in research. The culmination of the course is the planning and presentation of an independent research project.

  • Format: Lecture; 1 lab per week
  • Requirements: Exams; independent research project and presentation
  • Text/Materials: 2 texts; lab manual; calculator

Till Frank (Storrs)

No course description available.

Jamie Kleinman (Avery Point)

The primary goal of research in psychology is to generate new insights into human behavior. The course provides first-hand experience in all phases of research: the development of a hypothesis, design of research, statistical analysis of data, and interpretation of results. Instruction is given in the various research strategies, statistics, measurement of behavior and ethics in research. The culmination of the course is the planning and presentation of an independent research project.

  • Format: Prezi lectures; small and large group discussions; laboratory
  • Requirements: 2 exams; research project and presentation; homework; APA-style paper
  • Text/Materials: 2 texts; lab manual; calculator

Eric Lundquist (Storrs)

The primary goal of research in psychology is to generate new insights into human behavior. The course provides first-hand experience in all phases of research: the development of a hypothesis, design of research, statistical analysis of data, and interpretation of results. Instruction is given in the various research strategies, statistics, measurement of behavior and ethics in research. The culmination of the course is the planning and presentation of an independent research project.

  • Format: Lecture; 1 lab per week
  • Requirements: Exams; independent research project and presentation
  • Text/Materials: 2 texts; lab manual; calculator

Kerry Marsh (Hartford)

No course description available.

Steven Mellor (Storrs)

The primary goal of research in psychology is to generate new insights into human behavior. The course provides first-hand experience in all phases of research: the development of a hypothesis, design of research, statistical analysis of data, and interpretation of results. Instruction is given in the various research strategies, statistics, measurement of behavior and ethics in research. The culmination of the course is the planning and presentation of an independent research project.

  • Format: Lecture; 1 lab per week
  • Requirements: Exams; independent research project and presentation
  • Text/Materials: 2 texts; lab manual; calculator

Stephanie Milan (Storrs)

The primary goal of research in psychology is to generate new insights into human behavior. The course provides first-hand experience in all phases of research: the development of a hypothesis, design of research, statistical analysis of data, and interpretation of results. Instruction is given in the various research strategies, statistics, measurement of behavior and ethics in research. The culmination of the course is the planning and presentation of an independent research project.

  • Format: Lecture; 1 lab per week
  • Requirements: Exams; independent research project and presentation
  • Text/Materials: 2 texts; lab manual; calculator

Diane Quinn (Storrs)

No course description available.

Ian Stevenson (Storrs)

No course description available.

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2101. Introduction to Multicultural Psychology

Area IV Lecture

(275) Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 1100, and 1101 or 1103.

General introduction to cross-cultural and multicultural issues and the role psychology has played in understanding the experiences of diverse groups. CA 4.

Terms typically offered:

This course is not typically offered at any campus during any term.

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2110. Psychology of Human Sexuality

Area III and Area IV Lecture

Three credits. Recommended preparation: PSYC 1100.

Sexuality from across psychological science, highlighting relevant theoretical perspectives, methodology, and empirical research.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Varies Varies
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Stamford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Waterbury Not typically offered Not typically offered

Seth Kalichman (Storrs)

No course description available.

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2200. Physiological Psychology

Area II

(257) Three credits. Prerequisite: BIOL 1102 or 1107 or PNB 2264-2265, and PSYC 1100.

Physiological processes related to motivation, emotion, sensory processes, motor skills, learning, and psychiatric conditions.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Fall, Spring Not typically offered
Avery Point Varies Not typically offered
Hartford Varies Not typically offered
Stamford Fall Not typically offered
Waterbury Varies Not typically offered

Robert Astur (Waterbury)

This course will provide an overview of the anatomy and physiology of the brain, as a foundation for understanding how brain function (and dysfunction) translates into behavior. Topics will include “current interest” discussions such as (examples): whether the teenage brain is fully mature, how anti-depressants work, neuroimaging methods, sex differences, music and the brain, autism, recreational drugs and the brain, and more.

  • Format: Multi-media lecture
  • Requirements: 2 exams plus final
  • Text/Materials: 1 text

Leslie Burton (Stamford)

No course description available.

James Chrobak (Storrs)

Introduction to how distinct levels of neurobiology (from genes, molecules, proteins to neural circuits and neural systems) influence behavior and cognition. Emphasis is on forebrain systems that support movement, attention, decision-making, and memory as well as the neural changes associated with psychological (ADHD), psychiatric (depression, schizophrenia) and neurological dysfunction (Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease). Past instances of honors conversion.

  • Format: PowerPoint lecture; films; optional student presentations
  • Requirements: 5 short, multiple-choice exams plus final exam
  • Text/Materials: 1 text; supplemental online readings

R. Holly Fitch (Storrs)

This course will provide an overview of the anatomy and physiology of the brain, as a foundation for understanding how brain function (and dysfunction) translates into behavior. Topics will include “current interest” discussions such as (examples): whether the teenage brain is fully mature, how anti-depressants work, neuroimaging methods, sex differences, music and the brain, autism, recreational drugs and the brain, and more. Past instances of honors conversion.

  • Format: Multimedia lecture
  • Requirements: 4 exams plus final exam
  • Text/Materials: 1 text; supplemental website

Harvey Swadlow (Storrs)

A survey of the physiological substrates of sensation, perception, and behavior. Information from our sensory systems reaches our brain where it is integrated, analyzed, stored into memory and finally results in an amazingly complex behavioral output. This course consists of an introduction to this subject matter.

  • Format: Lecture
  • Requirements: 2-3 exams
  • Text/Materials: Text; supplemental readings

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2201. Drugs and Behavior

Area III and Area IV Lecture

(259) Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 1100 or BIOL 1107.

An overview of drug effects on chemical transmission in the nervous system, with an emphasis on the behavioral/psychological effects of drugs.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Spring Not typically offered
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Varies Not typically offered
Stamford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Waterbury Not typically offered Not typically offered

John Salamone (Storrs)

No course description available. Past instances of honors conversion.

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2208. Sensory Systems Neuroscience

Approval pending for usage on the psychological sciences plan of study: May be substituted for an Area II course for the major plans of study but not the minor plan of study.

Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 1100 or BIOL 1107 or BIOL 1108. Recommended preparation: PSYC 2200.

Cellular, circuit and neural systems basis of sensation and perception including evolutionary and ecological differences among mammals.

Terms typically offered:

This course is a new course in the 2016-2017 catalog. It was formerly offered as PSYC 3501 (Sensation and Perception) by Heather Read.

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Varies Not typically offered
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Stamford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Waterbury Not typically offered Not typically offered

Heather Read (Storrs)

This course is an introduction to the biological mechanisms of brain function and the relation between these mechanisms and sensation and perception. The basics of neural anatomy, physiology and psychophysics will be presented to the students. Some rudimentary concepts of how neuronal circuits affect sensory processes will be covered. They will learn what the building elements of the central nervous system are and how they are combined to produce functional units at a higher level and give rise to perception. Topics related to brain development, damage and abnormal functioning will also be covered and discussed in the light of modern theories of nervous system malfunction. Mechanisms of sensory processing will be covered and compared between human and other mammalian brains with some emphasis on human clinical techniques (e.g. magnetic resonance imaging and optical imaging). The students should become familiar with three general levels of analysis and discussion: a) the level of events in the perhipheral sensory organ b) the level of central nervous system; and c) the level of behavioral phenomena and sensory perceptual abilities.

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2300. Abnormal Psychology

Area I

(245) Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 1100, and PSYC 1101 or 1103.

Nature of abnormal behavior, theories and data regarding symptoms, etiology, treatment and prevention of mental disorders.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Fall, Spring Summer
Avery Point Fall Not typically offered
Hartford Fall, Spring Not typically offered
Stamford Not typically offered Summer (SS1)
Waterbury Spring Summer

Dean Cruess (Storrs)

This course involves the scientific study of the mental disorders or psychopathology in children, adolescents, and adults. We will examine in detail the etiology, development and course, epidemiology, diagnostic criteria, and major treatments of the main psychological disorders. Psychiatric disorders covered include: Anxiety Disorders and Depressive Disorders; Obsessive Compulsive and Related Disorders; Posttraumatic Stress Disorder; Schizophrenia; Bipolar Disorder; Somatic Symptom Disorders; Eating Disorders; Disruptive, Impulse Control and Conduct Disorders; Substance Use and Addictive Disorders; Personality Disorders; and many others.

  • Format: Lecture; videos; case studies; class discussion
  • Requirements: 3 exams
  • Text/Materials: 1 textbook

Chi-Ming Chen (Storrs)

This course involves the scientific study of abnormal behavior with a focus on understanding the history, epidemiology, etiology, symptom, assessment, and treatment of the psychiatric disorders, including anxiety disorders, obsessive compulsive and related disorders, trauma and stressor related disorders, somatic and dissociative disorders, mood disorders, and schizophrenia spectrum. Explanatory models/perspectives for each psychiatric disorder will be covered. Past instances of honors conversion.

  • Format: Lecture; films; case studies; class discussion
  • Requirements: 3 exams
  • Text/Materials: 1 textbook; pdf files on HuskyCT

Inge-Marie Eigsti (Storrs)

This course is about psychological problems – variously called psychopathology, mental illness, or behavioral disorders. Approximately 1 of 20 individuals experiences some psychological difficulty during their lifetime. Thus, the burden of such problems at both the societal and individual levels is tremendous. We will critically assess a) the variety of pathways of human development and health followed by different individuals, and what factors (biological, societal and cultural factors) influence the paths to health or disorder; b) the role that evidence (research) can play in understanding and treating mental illness, discussing some of the built-in complexities of the research process; and c) the difficulties experienced by people with mental illnesses.

  • Format: Lecture; class discussion; films
  • Requirements: 3 exams; 1 paper; in-class, brief discussion points
  • Text/Materials: 1 text; readings on reserve

Julianne Fenster (Storrs)

No course description available.

Amy Gorin (Storrs)

This course serves as an introduction to abnormal behavior and the classification, diagnosis, and treatment of psychological problems and disorders. For each disorder that we cover, we will draw on several theoretical perspectives to discuss possible etiological factors and to review available treatment options. Emphasis will be placed on critically analyzing and integrating theoretical concepts and empirical research in the field of mental health.

  • Format: Lecture; videos; discussion; small group activities
  • Requirements: 3-4 exams; 1 short paper; in-class participation
  • Text/Materials: 1 textbook; supplemental readings

Jamie Kleinman (Avery Point)

This course allows students to develop an understanding of current theory and empirical research regarding emotional and behavioral disorders within their appropriate multicultural context. The etiology, diagnosis, and treatment for mental disorders including, but not limited to Anxiety Disorders, Mood Disorders, Schizophrenia, Personality Disorders, Substance Use Disorders, and disorders that begin during childhood are covered. These disorders are viewed from multiple perspectives including biological, cognitive, and psychodynamic. Students are encouraged to develop critical thinking and analytical abilities through class discussions and case analysis.

  • Format: Prezi lectures; small and large group discussion; videos; case analysis
  • Requirements: 3 exams; 3 short essays including 1 case analysis
  • Text/Materials: 1 textbook; supplemental readings

Stephanie Milan (Storrs)

No course description available. Past instances of honors conversion.

Kimberli Treadwell (Waterbury)

Examines issues relevant to abnormal psychology and mental health and illness, including causes, symptoms, and treatments of various disorders (i.e. mood, anxiety, schizophrenia, disorders of childhood, etc.) This information will be viewed from a variety of perspectives or paradigms (psychodynamic, behavioral, cognitive, biological, and cultural).

  • Format: Lecture; interaction with i>clicker response technology; case studies; discussion
  • Requirements: 3 exams; paper
  • Text/Materials: 1 textbook; i>clicker

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2300W. Abnormal Psychology

Area I

(245W) Prerequisite: PSYC 1100, and PSYC 1101 or 1103; ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Not typically offered Not typically offered
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Stamford Varies Not typically offered
Waterbury Not typically offered Not typically offered

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2301. The Study of Personality

Area I

(243) Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 1100, and PSYC 1101 or 1103.

Theories, methods, and research in both clinical and experimental approaches to personality.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Not typically offered Not typically offered
Avery Point Varies Not typically offered
Hartford Varies Summer (SS1)
Stamford Not typically offered Summer (SS1)
Waterbury Fall Not typically offered

Jamie Kleinman (Avery Point)

In this course students will be encouraged to develop an understanding of current theory and empirical research regarding the study of human personality. They will explore what causes individual differences in personality, how personality develops, and the benefits and repercussions of having different personality types. The course will focus on different schools of thought regarding the formation of personality including the biological, psychodynamic, humanistic, behavioral, and cognitive perspectives. Students will be encouraged to develop critical thinking, analytical abilities and the articulation of ideas in both written and oral form.

  • Format: Prezi lectures; videos; small and large group discussion; in-class participation exercises
  • Requirements: 3 exams; 3 short essays covering the personality development of a famous individual; in-class exercises
  • Text/Materials: 1 textbook; supplemental readings

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2400. Developmental Psychology

Area I

(236) Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 1100, and PSYC 1101 or 1103.

Social behavior, personality, perception, cognition, language, intelligence, learning, biobehavioral processes, and research methodology in developmental perspective.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Fall, Spring Summer
Avery Point Varies Not typically offered
Hartford Fall, Spring Summer (SS1)
Stamford Varies Varies
Waterbury Varies Not typically offered

Marie Coppola (Storrs)

No course description available. Past instances of honors conversion.

Kimberly Cuevas (Waterbury)

This course will introduce you to the scientific study of children’s development from conception through childhood. Our approach will focus on the theories, methods, and phenomena of child psychology, and considers the implications of this information for enhancing child development. We will examine fundamental aspects of development, including physical, cognitive, and perceptual development; emotional, cultural, and social influences on development; and the real-life implications of this research for social policy and decision making.

  • Format: PowerPoint lecture; videos; active demonstrations; discussion
  • Requirements: 4 exams (multiple choice and short answer); 3 short (3 pages) writing assignments; in-class assignments
  • Text/Materials: How Children Develop (4th ed.) by Siegler, DeLoache, Eisenberg, and Saffran

Elena Levy (Stamford)

No course description available.

Adam Sheya (Storrs)

No course description available.

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2500. Learning

Area II

(220) Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 1100, and PSYC 1101 or 1103.

Learning and memory principles found in animal research and their relationship to human behavior. Human and other species’ specific types of unique learning abilities.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Fall, Spring Summer
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Varies Not typically offered
Stamford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Waterbury Fall Summer

Kimberly Cuevas (Waterbury)

This course will introduce students to the behavioral, biological, and psychological approaches to the study of learning and memory. Our approach will focus specifically on neuroscience investigations examining the physiological mechanisms that underlie learning and memory, and the influence of this field of study to clinical, research, and real-life applications. This course will provide students with a general overview of the fundamental concepts, theories, and principles of learning and memory.

  • Format: PowerPoint lecture; videos; active demonstrations
  • Requirements: 4 exams (multiple choice and short answer); 3 short writing assignments; in-class assignments
  • Text/Materials: Learning and Memory (2nd ed.) by Gluck, Mercado, and Myers

Eric Lundquist (Storrs)

No course description available.

Etan Markus (Storrs)

This class will examine how stimuli get associated with each other and whether learning works the same way in humans as in other animals. The material will span simple through complex learning and memory processes. We will review Learning Theory and see whether it can explain all behaviors. Recent finding regarding the neuronal mechanisms that underlie different types of learning and memory will be presented. Past instances of honors conversion.

  • Format: Multimedia lecture
  • Requirements: 3 exams; daily quiz
  • Text/Materials: Textbook; additional readings; i>clicker

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2501. Cognitive Psychology

Area II

(256) Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 1100, and PSYC 1101 or 1103.

Different views of mental representation and processes involved in memory, language comprehension, perception, attention, and problem solving. Historical development of models in cognitive psychology.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Fall, Spring Summer
Avery Point Varies Not typically offered
Hartford Varies Not typically offered
Stamford Spring Summer (SS2)
Waterbury Spring Not typically offered

Julie Brown (Storrs)

Overview of the psychological processes involved in memory, language comprehension, perception, attention, and problem solving. Emphasizes historical development of models in cognitive psychology, including recent influence of cognitive neuroscience. Past instances of honors conversion.

  • Format: Lecture; PowerPoint slides; videos
  • Requirements: 3 exams; quizzes; online cognitive labs; in-class assignments
  • Text/Materials: 1 text; additional required readings

Kimberly Cuevas (Waterbury)

This course will provide students with an overview of the psychological processes involved in memory, attention, problem solving, language, and perception. It will also emphasize the historical development of models in cognitive psychology, including recent influence of cognitive neuroscience.

  • Format: PowerPoint lecture; video; active demonstrations
  • Requirements: 3 exams (multiple choice and short answer); CogLab participation and assignments; group presentation; in-class assignments
  • Text/Materials: Cognitive Psychology: Connecting Mind, Research and Everyday Experience (3rd ed.) by Goldstein; Online CogLab subscription

James Dixon (Storrs)

Overview of the psychological processes involved in memory, language comprehension, perception, attention, and problem solving. Emphasizes historical development of models in cognitive psychology, including recent influence of cognitive neuroscience.

  • Format: Lecture
  • Requirements:
  • Text/Materials: 1 text; additional required readings

Eric Lundquist (Storrs)

No course description available.

James Magnuson (Storrs)

Overview of the psychological processes involved in memory, language comprehension, perception, attention, and problem solving. Emphasizes historical development of models in cognitive psychology, including recent influence of cognitive neuroscience.

  • Format: Lecture
  • Requirements: 2-3 multiple choice exams
  • Text/Materials: 1 text; additional required readings

Jay Rueckl (Storrs)

Overview of the psychological processes involved in memory, language comprehension, perception, attention, and problem solving. Emphasizes historical development of models in cognitive psychology, including recent influence of cognitive neuroscience.

  • Format: Lecture
  • Requirements: 2-3 essay exams
  • Text/Materials: 1 text; additional required readings

Jerome Sehulster (Stamford)

No course description available.

Whitney Tabor (Storrs)

Overview of the psychological processes involved in memory, language comprehension, perception, attention, and problem solving. Emphasizes historical development of models in cognitive psychology, including recent influence of cognitive neuroscience.

  • Format: Lecture
  • Requirements:
  • Text/Materials: 1 text; additional required readings

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2600. Industrial/Organizational Psychology

Area I

(268) Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 1100, and PSYC 1101 or 1103.

Applications of psychology in the workplace: Measurement, personnel decisions, performance appraisal, training, motivation, worker attitudes, leadership, ergonomics and job design, workplace health and safety.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Fall, Spring Varies
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Varies Varies
Stamford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Waterbury Not typically offered Not typically offered

Janet Barnes-Farrell (Storrs)

Theories, methods, and issues in the application of psychological principles in work settings. Time is devoted to each of the three major sub-specialties that currently dominate the field of industrial/organizational psychology: personnel psychology, organizational psychology, and human factors psychology. Primary emphasis is on personnel psychology and organizational psychology approaches to understanding work behavior. Topics covered in this course include: job analysis, measurement and prediction of individual differences, occupational stress, personnel decisions, training, performance appraisal, work motivation, work attitudes, leadership, and social influences on work behavior. Past instances of honors conversion.

  • Format: 2-3 lectures per week
  • Requirements: 3-4 objective exams; additional, varied requirements (e.g., homework assignments)
  • Text/Materials: 1 required text

Vicki Magley (Storrs)

Applications of psychology in the workplace: Measurement, personnel decisions, performance appraisal, training, motivation, worker attitudes, leadership, ergonomics and job design, workplace health and safety.

  • Format: 2-3 lectures per week; discussion
  • Requirements: Quizzes; final exam; homework assignments
  • Text/Materials: 1 textbook

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2700. Social Psychology

Area I

(240) Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 1100, and 1101 or 1103.

Attitudes, social cognition, social influence, interpersonal relations, group dynamics.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Fall, Spring Varies
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Varies Not typically offered
Stamford Spring Summer (SS1)
Waterbury Not typically offered Not typically offered

V. Bede Agocha (Storrs)

This course examines how individuals are influenced by the (real or imagined) presence of other people and situations. Topics surveyed include social perception, the self, attitudes and persuasion, social influence, close relationships, stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination, aggression and helping, and health and risk behavior. Theory and data are emphasized.

  • Format: Lecture
  • Requirements: 4 exams; 8 short writing assignments
  • Text/Materials: 1 text; websites

Colin Leach (Storrs)

No course description available.

Felicia Pratto (Storrs)

The course surveys topics in social psychology including the self, perceiving and explaining other people, attitudes and persuasion, social influence, close relationships, prejudice, stereotyping, and discrimination, aggression, and helping behavior. Theory and data are emphasized.

  • Format: Lecture
  • Requirements: 3 exams; 5 short papers
  • Text/Materials: 1 text; websites

Nairan Ramirez-Esparza (Storrs)

One aim of this course is to introduce you to the perspectives, research methods, and findings of social psychology. Another, equally important aim is to cultivate your own skills for analyzing complex social events and apply your knowledge to everyday life events. Past instances of honors conversion.

  • Format: PowerPoint Lecture; short films; in-class demonstrations
  • Requirements: 4 multiple-choice exams; in-class participation with i>clicker
  • Text/Materials: Gilovich T., Keltner, D., Chen, S., & Nisbett, R. E. (2013). Social Psychology (3rd Ed). New York: W.W. Norton & Company.; i>clicker

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2701. Social Psychology of Multiculturalism

Area IV Lecture

(276) Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 1100, and 1101 or 1103. Recommended preparation: PSYC 2700.

Introduction to theoretical perspectives and behavioral research that seek to explain the nature and mechanisms of intergroup relations and the psychology of culture, prejudice, and biased behavior. CA 4.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Varies Not typically offered
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Stamford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Waterbury Not typically offered Not typically offered

V. Bede Agocha (Storrs)

No course description available.

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3100. The History and Systems of Psychology

Area III

(291) Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 1100, 1101 or 1103; PSYC 2300/W or 2301 or 2400 or 2600 or 2700; PSYC 2200 or 2500 or 2501 or 3201 or 3500 or 3501.

Philosophical and scientific origins and major schools, including structuralism, functionalism, behaviorism, gestalt, and psychoanalysis.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Fall, Spring Not typically offered
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Varies Not typically offered
Stamford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Waterbury Not typically offered Not typically offered

Tehran Davis (Storrs)

The primary goal of the course is to provide a historical perspective that enhances your understanding of the field of psychology. We will examine how contemporary theories of psychology originated and developed. Particular emphasis will be placed on the philosophic and scientific origins of many of the long-standing debates and issues in psychology, how those issues arose over the course of human inquiry before psychology was founded as an independent scientific discipline, and how these age old debates are manifest in contemporary psychology. We will address such topics as: the history of ideas about “the mind;” key historical and social events that shaped the field; when and how psychology became a science; as well as life histories of important figures.

Robert Henning (Storrs)

This course focuses on the development of psychological thought in Western civilization beginning with notable Greek philosophers and ending with an examination of present-day trends. The educational goals of this course include the following: (1) Gain an understanding of how institutional psychology developed and the extent that it was shaped by people, culture, needs, the evolution of scientific thinking, discoveries in other fields and a wide range of other historical events. (2) Recognize both strengths and weaknesses of dominant paradigms in psychology. (3) Form substantive opinions about the history of psychology, and be able to support/defend them. (4) Be able to apply what you have learned about the history and systems of psychology to new issues or questions in the field of psychology and in the application of psychology, and to your career interests. (5) Be able to show that you have studied at a Research I university in one of the leading psychology departments in the USA (and the world!). Past instances of honors conversion.

  • Format: Attending lecture and joining in on discussions is critical to doing well on all exams in this course.
  • Requirements: Short essay and multiple-choice exams
  • Text/Materials: 1 textbook; selected readings posted on HuskyCT

Elena Levy (Stamford)

No course description available.

Eric Lundquist (Storrs)

No course description available.

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3100W. The History and Systems of Psychology

Area III

(291) Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 1100, 1101 or 1103; PSYC 2300/W or 2301 or 2400 or 2600 or 2700; PSYC 2200 or 2500 or 2501 or 3201 or 3500 or 3501; ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Not typically offered Not typically offered
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Stamford Fall, Spring Not typically offered
Waterbury Not typically offered Not typically offered

Elena Levy (Stamford)

No course description available. Past instances of honors conversion.

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3101. Psychological Testing

Area IV Lecture

(281) Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 2100Q or 2100WQ.

Practical and theoretical interpretation of common personality, industrial, educational, cognitive, and attitude tests. Evaluating utility, test bias, and error. Using tests in clinical, educational, and workplace settings.

Terms typically offered:

This course is not typically offered at any campus during any term.

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3102. Psychology of Women

Area III and Area IV Lecture

(246) (Also offered as WGSS 3102.) Three credits. Prerequisite: Three credits of 2000 to 3000-level psychology.

Gender roles, socialization, women and work, women’s relationships, violence against women, and other topics. Theory and research. CA 4.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Varies Not typically offered
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Not typically offered Varies
Stamford Not typically offered Varies
Waterbury Not typically offered Not typically offered

Vicki Magley (Storrs)

Gender roles, socialization, women and work, women’s relationships, violence against women, and other topics. Theory and research.

  • Format: Lectures; discussions; films; outside classroom events.
  • Requirements: Quizzes; homework assignments; final exam
  • Text/Materials: 1 textbook; homework on HuskyCT

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3102W. Psychology of Women

Area III and Area IV Lecture

(246) (Also offered as WGSS 3102W.) Three credits. Prerequisite: Three credits of 2000 to 3000-level psychology; ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

Terms typically offered:

This course is not typically offered at any campus during any term and is currently archived from the catalog.

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3103. Motivation and Emotion

Area IV Lecture

(255) (Also offered as COMM 3103.) Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 1100, and PSYC 1101 or 1103; open to juniors or higher.

Cognition, brain mechanisms, biofeedback, aggression, sex, competence, social influence, and conformity.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Varies Not typically offered
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Stamford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Waterbury Not typically offered Not typically offered

Ross Buck (Storrs)

No course description available.

Leslie Burton (Stamford)

No course description available.

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3104. Environmental Psychology

Area IV Lecture

(248) Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 2700.

Reciprocal relationships between built and natural environments and human behavior.

Terms typically offered:

This course is not typically offered at any campus during any term.

Kerry Marsh (Hartford)

This course focuses on the relationship between organisms and environments at multiple levels of analysis, covering the traditional social and societal perspective of environmental psychology, as well as the perception-based, symbiotic perspective of ecological psychology. Topics at the social and societal level include how natural and constructed environments influence behavior through conditions such as crowding and noise and how researchers change attitudes and behaviors to reduce negative impact on the environment (e.g., pollution, global warming). Ecological psychology topics include meaning and fit of the physical environment to the individual (affordances), designing particular settings (e.g., urban settings, workplaces) to better provide social affordances, and discussing special applications of environmental psychology (e.g., speeding emergency evacuation of buildings).

  • Format: Lecture; discussion; weekly blog entries
  • Requirements: Exams; projects; papers
  • Text/Materials: Set of readings; 2 books (1 required, 1 optional)

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3105. Health Psychology

Area III and Area IV Lecture

(251) Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 1100, and PSYC 1101 or 1103.

The interface between psychology and health is examined using a biopsychosocial model. Topics include stress and coping, health promotion, adjustment to chronic illness, and the psychology of health behaviors.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Fall, Spring Summer
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Varies Not typically offered
Stamford Varies Not typically offered
Waterbury Not typically offered Not typically offered

Rick Gibbons (Storrs)

This course concerns psychosocial factors related to health behavior and physical health status. We will use social psychology theory as well as theories from other areas of psychology to examine social, environmental, and dispositional influences on health promoting behaviors, like exercise, healthy eating, and cancer screening; as well as health risk behaviors, such as substance use and abuse, unprotected sex, and overeating. Specific topics that we will discuss include the effects of racial discrimination and social exclusion on health behavior; gender, age, and racial/ethnicity differences in health status; and the role of Gene x Environment interactions in promoting and reducing health risk. The course will consist of participatory lecture, with a focus on real-world applications and examples.

  • Format: PowerPoint lecture supplemented by videos, links to health websites, and discussion question.
  • Requirements: 3 multiple choice exams, including a final; extra credit option (a 5-minute PowerPoint presentation) for up 10 people
  • Text/Materials: Health Psychology (9th ed.) by Shelley Taylor; occasional, additional readings

Amy Gorin (Storrs)

This course will review the association between behavioral, social, and psychological factors and physical health and well-being. We will explore topics such as the mind-body connection, the impact of the physical and social environment on health, and the role behavioral choices can play in the development and management of chronic disease. Theories and interventions related to health and behavior will be emphasized. We will focus on 3 broad content areas: (1) the history and science behind health psychology, as well as key health behaviors relevant to the field; (2) stress, coping, pain, and managing chronic illness; (3) psychological dimensions of HIV/AIDS, cancer, the health care system, and death and dying.

  • Format: Lecture; videos; discussion; small group activities
  • Requirements: Exams; paper; participation
  • Text/Materials: 1 textbook; supplemental readings

Blair T. Johnson (Storrs)

No course description available.

Seth Kalichman (Storrs)

No course description available.

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3106. Black Psychology

Area IV Lecture

(270) (Also offered as AFRA 3106.) Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 1100, and PSYC 1101 or 1103.

Empirical and theoretical literature on psychological experiences of African Americans. Impact of race, culture, and ethnicity on psychological development. CA 4.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Spring Not typically offered
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Stamford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Waterbury Not typically offered Not typically offered

V. Bede Agocha (Storrs)

This course is designed to provide students with a broad and general overview of the research and psychological experiences of people of African descent. We will explore historical context, psychological research, theoretical perspectives, and contemporary experiences. Emphasis will be placed on the impact of race, culture, and ethnicity on psychological development.

  • Format: Lecture; discussion; films; group interactions
  • Requirements: 4-5 papers; class presentation
  • Text/Materials: Reserved readings; handouts

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3106W. Black Psychology

Area IV Lecture

(270W) (Also offered as AFRA 3106W.) Prerequisite: PSYC 1100, and PSYC 1101 or 1103; ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011. CA 4.

Terms typically offered:

This course is not typically offered at any campus during any term and is currently archived from the catalog.

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3150. Laboratory in Health Psychology

Area IV Lab

Three credits. Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory. Prerequisite: PSYC 3105.

Introduction to experimental design and research methods in health psychology. Includes a class research project.

Terms typically offered:

This course is not typically offered at any campus during any term.

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3200. Introduction to Behavioral Genetics

Area IV Lecture

(205) Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 1100, and BIOL 1102, or 1107 and 1108; open to juniors or higher.

Methods, concepts and findings of behavioral genetics in animals and humans.

Terms typically offered:

This course is not typically offered at any campus during any term.

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3200W. Introduction to Behavioral Genetics

Area IV Lecture

(205W) Prerequisite: PSYC 1100, and BIOL 1102, or 1107 and 1108; ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011; open to juniors or higher.

Terms typically offered:

This course is not typically offered at any campus during any term.

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3201. Animal Behavior

Area II

(253) (Also offered as EEB 3201.) Three credits. Prerequisite: BIOL 1102 or 1107, and PSYC 1100.

Principles of animal behavior derived from a review of descriptive and analytic studies in laboratory and field. Sometimes offered in multimedia format.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Fall, Spring Not typically offered
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Spring (odd years) Not typically offered
Stamford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Waterbury Spring (even years) Not typically offered

David B. Miller (Storrs)

A broad overview of the scientific study of species-typical animal behavior. Topics include the following: contemporary issues, history, ethological methods, ethological concepts, domestication, evolution and adaptation, mating, hormones and semiochemicals, communication, social organization, migration, development, learning. Multimedia Lecture Version:

  • Format: Computerized, multimedia lecture
  • Requirements: 3 exams
  • Text/Materials: 1 textbook

Multimedia Hybrid Version:

  • Format: 3-6 hours of online content delivery weekly via streaming QuickTime videos; in-class lectures on Tuesdays; Honors discussion on Thursdays
  • Requirements: 3 exams
  • Text/Materials: None

Stephen Trumbo (Hartford, Waterbury)

The concepts and methods used in the scientific study of the causes of animal behavior are considered. These are physiological (neural and endocrine), developmental (genes and environment), ecological, and phylogenetic. General principles are related to examples of specific animal behaviors. These include perception, biological rhythms, learning, communication, migration, mating, parenting, aggression, predation, social organization, and altruism.

  • Format: Lectures with videos and discussion
  • Requirements: 3 exams; 3 video reports
  • Text/Materials: 1 textbook

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3250. Laboratory in Animal Behavior and Learning

Area IV Lab

(263) Three credits. One 3-hour lecture and additional laboratory hours. Prerequisite: PSYC 2100Q or PSYC 2100WQ and PSYC 2200 or 2500 or 3201, and consent of instructor.

A laboratory course to supplement PSYC 3201.

Terms typically offered:

This course is not typically offered at any campus during any term and is currently archived from the catalog.

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3250W. Laboratory in Animal Behavior and Learning

Area IV Lab

(267) Three credits. One 3-hour laboratory period and additional hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: PSYC 2100Q or 2100WQ, and PSYC 2200, which may be taken concurrently.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Fall Not typically offered
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Stamford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Waterbury Not typically offered Not typically offered

Etan Markus (Storrs)

This hands-on laboratory will provide students with an opportunity to conduct learning and memory experiments using modern behavioral techniques. Rats will be trained on different types of tasks. The results will be discussed and written up in four papers. Comparison of results will form the basis for understanding of the function of different brain structures. Designed for Premed, Neuroscience and Cognitive Science minor students.

  • Format: Lecture; laboratory
  • Requirements: 4 papers (APA format); exam
  • Text/Materials: Text; readings

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3251. Laboratory in Physiological Psychology

Area IV Lab

(263W) Prerequisite: PSYC 2100Q or PSYC 2100WQ and PSYC 2200 or 2500 or 3201, and consent of instructor; ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

Techniques employed in experimental investigation of the anatomical and physiological bases of behavior.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Fall, Spring Not typically offered
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Stamford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Waterbury Not typically offered Not typically offered

R. Holly Fitch (Storrs)

No course description available.

John Salamone (Storrs)

No course description available.

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3251W. Laboratory in Physiological Psychology

Area IV Lab

(267W) Prerequisite: PSYC 2100Q or 2100WQ, and PSYC 2200, which may be taken concurrently; ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

Terms typically offered:

This course is not typically offered at any campus during any term and is currently archived from the catalog.

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3252. Drugs and Behavior Laboratory

Area IV Lab

(252) Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 2100Q or 2100WQ and PSYC 2201.

Techniques employed in the experimental investigation of drug action. Laboratory exercises illustrate behavioral and neural effects of various psychoactive pharmacological agents such as stimulants, antipsychotics, antidepressants, antiparkinsonian drugs, anxiolytics, sedative/hypnotics.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Spring Summer (May or SS2)
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Stamford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Waterbury Not typically offered Not typically offered

John Salamone (Storrs)

No course description available.

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3253. Sensory Neuroscience Laboratory

Area IV Lab

Three credits. A one-hour lecture and two 2-hour laboratories each week. Prerequisite: PSYC 2100Q or 2100WQ and PSYC 3501.

Techniques employed in the experimental investigation of sensory neuroscience. Laboratory exercises in psychophysics and assessment of human and animal sensory abilities. Elementary computer programming is used to synthesize and process sound files and analyze psychophysics data.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Fall, Spring Not typically offered
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Stamford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Waterbury Not typically offered Not typically offered

Heather Read (Storrs)

Techniques employed in the experimental investigation of sensory neuroscience. Laboratory exercises in psychophysics and assessment of human and animal sensory abilities. Elementary computer programming is used to synthesize and process sound files and analyze psychophysics data.

  • Format: 1-hour lectures followed by 2-hour plus additional 2-hour lab each week

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3270. Current Topics in Behavioral Neurosicnence

Approval pending for usage on the psychological sciences plan of study: May be substituted for an Area IV Lecture course for the major plans of study but not the minor plan of study.

Three credits. Prerequisite: Instructor consent required. With a change in topic, course may be repeated for credit.

Selected topics vary with each offering (e.g., The Neurobiology of Memory and Decision-Making, Sensory Coding and Decoding, Animal Models of Basal Ganglia Dysfunction, Animal Models of Developmental Disorders).

Terms typically offered:

This course is a new course in the 2016-2017 catalog. It will likely be offered for the first time during the 2017-2018 academic year.

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3300. Abnormal Childhood Psychology

Area IV Lecture

(249) Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 2400.

Theory, research, treatment, and prevention in developmental psychopathology from infancy through adolescence.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Not typically offered Not typically offered
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Stamford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Waterbury Fall Not typically offered

Kimberli Treadwell (Waterbury)

Examines theory, research, treatment, and prevention of developmental psychopathology from infancy through adolescence (i.e., mood, anxiety, intellectual deficits, autism, attention problems, etc.). This information will be viewed from a variety of perspectives, with an emphasis on development and cultural contexts.

  • Format: Lecture, case examples, class discussion, small group activities, and participation with i>clicker response technology
  • Requirements: Final exam; combination of presentation, paper, and/or mid-term exam
  • Text/Materials: textbook; i>clicker

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3300W. Abnormal Childhood Psychology

Area IV Lecture

(249W) Prerequisite: PSYC 2400; ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

Terms typically offered:

This course is not typically offered at any campus during any term and is currently archived from the catalog.

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3301. Introduction to Clinical Psychology

Area IV Lecture

(269) Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 2300 or 2300W.

History of clinical psychology as a profession; graduate training and ethical responsibilities; assessment and treatment of psychological disorders; and clinical sub-specialities.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Fall, Spring Varies
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Stamford Spring Not typically offered
Waterbury Varies Not typically offered

Jamie Kleinman (Avery Point)

In this course students will gain an understanding of professional practices of clinical psychologists by exploring the history of clinical psychology as a profession and discussing ethical responsibilities in context. Research methods in clinical psychology will be a strong focus, particularly the use of empirically validated methods of assessment and treatment. The course will also cover subspecialties within the field of clinical psychology and place the work of clinical psychologists within a multicultural framework. Students will be encouraged to develop the skills necessary to pursue a career in clinical psychology (or related mental health fields) including effective communication through writing and discussion, case formulation, and editorial skills.

  • Format: Prezi lectures; small and large group discussion; videos; case analysis
  • Requirements: 1 semester-long critical analysis paper; 2 editorial assignments; 1 reaction paper; 1 take-home final
  • Text/Materials: 1 textbook; 3 mass production paperback books; supplemental readings

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3302W. Autism and Developmental Disorders

Approval pending for usage on the psychological sciences plan of study: May be substituted for an Area IV Lecture course for the major plans of study but not the minor plan of study.

Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 2300, and PSYC 2400; ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011 or 3800. Open to juniors or higher.

Identification, treatment, education, and support of individuals with developmental concerns, particularly autism spectrum disorders.

Terms typically offered:

This course is a new course in the 2016-2017 catalog. It was formerly offered as PSYC 3370 (Current Topics in Clinical Psychology, Clinical and Research Approaches: Autism & Developmental Disabilities) by Inge-Marie Eigsti.

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Spring (odd years)* Not typically offered
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Stamford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Waterbury Not typically offered Not typically offered

Inge-Marie Eigsti (Storrs)

This course is designed to give students an introduction to the unique characteristics and challenges of individuals with autism and other developmental disabilities. In this course, we will address the main concepts and issues involved in the identification, treatment, education, and support of children and adults with developmental concerns, focusing on autism spectrum disorders. In addressing these issues, we will also explore beliefs about intelligence, historical trends in society’s perspective on disabilities, and legal and ethical considerations. A primary goal of this course is for students to apply both reading and experience to develop an understanding and appreciation of the realities of developmental disability, from the perspective of individuals, families, educators, and society in general. Very roughly, the first half of the semester focuses on theoretical issues and the second half on clinical application. Enrollment is limited to juniors and seniors; students should have taken PSYC 2300 (Abnormal Psych) and PSYC 2400 (Developmental Psych). Class members will partner with students in an “18-21 Transitional Classroom” which meets on campus in order to build a personal relationship with someone affected by a developmental disability.

  • Format: Lecture; discussion; engagement with individuals with developmental disabilities
  • Requirements: Multiple papers; in-class participation
  • Text/Materials: Primary sources (journal articles)

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3350. Laboratory in Personality

Area IV Lab

(244) Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 2100Q or 2100WQ or STAT 1100, PSYC 2301 and consent of instructor.

Experimental design and methodology in personality research, followed by a class project written individually by each student.

Terms typically offered:

This course is not typically offered at any campus during any term and is currently archived from the catalog.

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3350W. Laboratory in Personality

Area IV Lab

(244W) Prerequisite: PSYC 2100Q or 2100WQ or STAT 1100, PSYC 2301 and consent of instructor; ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Not typically offered Not typically offered
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Stamford Spring (even years) Not typically offered
Waterbury Not typically offered Not typically offered

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3370. Current Topics in Clinical Psychology

Area IV Lecture

(250) Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 2300/W or 3750 or instructor consent. May be repeated for credit with a change of topic.

Terms typically offered:

This course is not typically offered at any campus during any term and is currently archived from the catalog.

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3370W. Current Topics in Clinical Psychology

Area IV Lecture

(250W) Prerequisite: PSYC 2300/W or 3750 or instructor consent; ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Not typically offered Not typically offered
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Stamford Spring Not typically offered
Waterbury Not typically offered Not typically offered

Leslie Burton (Stamford) | Autism

No course description available.

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3400. Theories in Developmental Psychology

Area III and Area IV Lecture

(238) Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 2400.

Historical and contemporary theories of development. Includes Piaget, Vygotsky, Freud, Erikson, social-learning theory, ethological theory, and information-processing theory.

Terms typically offered:

This course is not typically offered at any campus during any term.

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3401. Psychology of Aging

Area IV Lecture

(272) Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 1100 and PSYC 1101 or 1103.

Psychological theories and research on adult development and aging. Focus on self development from adolescence through young adulthood, midlife and later life.

Terms typically offered:

This course is not typically offered at any campus during any term and is currently archived from the catalog.

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3402W. Child Development in Socio-Political Context

Area IV Lecture

Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 1100; PSYC 1101 or 1103; and PSYC 2400 or instructor consent; ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

Social, political, economic, and geographic influences on child development. Topics include children orphaned by AIDS or affected by war, child labor, and child trafficking. CA 4-INT.

Terms typically offered:

This course is not typically offered at any campus during any term and is currently archived from the catalog.

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3440. Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience

Approval pending for usage on the psychological sciences plan of study

Three credits. Prerequisite: Open to juniors or higher.

Survey of current research and methods in developmental cognitive neuroscience, an interdisciplinary scientific field at the boundaries of neuroscience, developmental psychology, and cognitive science.

Terms typically offered:

This course is not typically offered at any campus during any term.

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3450W. Laboratory in Developmental

Area IV Lab

(232W) Four credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 2400 and PSYC 2100Q or 2100WQ; ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

The techniques necessary for performing psychological research on young children; advanced topics.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Spring Not typically offered
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Stamford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Waterbury Not typically offered Not typically offered

Nicole Landi (Storrs)

No course description available.

Letitia Naigles (Storrs)

A laboratory course in developmental psychology, with two primary goals: (1) To understand techniques necessary for performing competent experiments and observations with young children, and (2) to explore advanced topics in developmental psychology. Students conduct studies with young children; results are written up in APA-style papers.

  • Format: Laboratory; lecture; discussion
  • Requirements: 2 papers
  • Text/Materials: Text; selected articles

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3470. Current Topics in Developmental Psychology

Area IV Lecture

(239) Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 2400 or instructor consent. With change of topic, may be repeated for credit.

Selected topics (e.g., infant development, peer relations, cognitive development, and developmental psychobiology) that may vary with each offering.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Fall Not typically offered
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Stamford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Waterbury Not typically offered Not typically offered

Marie Coppola (Storrs) | Modality Issues in Development

We will consider sign languages, which use the visuo-spatial modality, in contrast to spoken languages, which primarily use the auditory-oral modality, and examine the impact of being deaf on linguistic, cognitive, and neural development. The primary goals of the course will be to (1) Understand the basic similarities and differences between signed and spoken languages; (2) Appreciate the context of sign language and language acquisition in the Deaf community; (3) Become familiar with the scientific insights made possible by studying sign languages; (4) Evaluate the impact of deafness and/or use of a sign language on the development and end states of various aspects of cognition; and (5) Acquire basic knowledge regarding the neurobiology of sign language. Some basic questions include: Do children acquiring sign languages follow a similar or different developmental trajectory in acquiring language? How is the brain of a deaf person similar to or different from that of a hearing person? This is a rapidly changing field and there are always new findings to review and discuss. Past instances of honors conversion.

Letitia Naigles (Storrs) | Language Acquisition

No course description available.

Rhiannon Smith (Storrs) | Advanced Social Development

No course description available.

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3470W. Current Topics in Developmental Psychology

Area IV Lecture

(239W) Prerequisite: PSYC 2400 or instructor consent; ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

Terms typically offered:

This course is not typically offered at any campus during any term and is currently archived from the catalog.

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3500. The Psychology of Language

Area II

(221) Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 1100, and PSYC 1101 or 1103.

Those aspects of language that make it a uniquely efficient vehicle for communication and thought.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Fall, Spring Not typically offered
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Varies Not typically offered
Stamford Fall, Spring Not typically offered
Waterbury Varies Not typically offered

Gerry Altmann (Storrs)

No course description available. Past instances of honors conversion.

Elena Levy (Stamford)

No course description available.

Whitney Tabor (Storrs)

No course description available.

Eiling Yee (Storrs)

No course description available. Past instances of honors conversion.

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3501. Sensation and Perception

Area II

(254) Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 1100, and PSYC 1101 or 1103.

Sensory and perceptual processes in vision, hearing, touch, taste, and smell.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Varies Varies
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Varies Not typically offered
Stamford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Waterbury Not typically offered Not typically offered

Tehran Davis (Storrs)

No course description available.

Maxim Volgushev (Storrs)

No course description available.

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3502. Psychology of Consciousness

Area IV Lecture

(206) Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 1100.

The role of consciousness in human cognition is examined by comparing the conscious and unconscious operation of mental faculties including perception, memory, learning, and thought.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Not typically offered Not typically offered
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Stamford Fall Not typically offered
Waterbury Not typically offered Not typically offered

Leslie Burton (Stamford)

No course description available.

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3503. Computer Modelling of Cognitive Processes

Area IV Lecture

(260) Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 2501 or 3501.

Symbolic and connectionist approaches to modeling vision, problem solving, planning, deduction, language understanding, learning, and memory.

Terms typically offered:

This course is not typically offered at any campus during any term.

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3550W. Laboratory in Cognition

Area IV Lab

(210W) Three credits. One 3-hour laboratory period and additional hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: PSYC 2100Q or 2100WQ, and PSYC 2500 or 2501, which may be taken concurrently; ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

Selected experiments from the following topics: memory processes, categorization, language comprehension and problem solving.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Not typically offered Not typically offered
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Stamford Spring (odd years) Not typically offered
Waterbury Not typically offered Not typically offered

Jay Rueckl (Storrs)

Introduction to laboratory research in cognitive psychology. Students conduct a series of experiments on issues related to attention, memory, language, and categorization, culminating in an individual project of the student’s choosing. There is a strong emphasis on the relationship between theoretical developments and experimental research.

  • Format: Laboratory; lecture
  • Requirements: Lab reports; paper on final project
  • Text/Materials: Assigned readings

Jerome Sehulster (Stamford)

No course description available.

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3551W. Psycholinguistics Laboratory

Area IV Lab

(211W) Three credits. Two 3-hour laboratory periods. Prerequisite: PSYC 2100Q or 2100WQ; ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011. Recommended preparation: PSYC 2501 or 3500. May be taken concurrently.

Introduction to the experimental study of language understanding and use. Topics selected from among speech perception, word recognition, sentence processing, language production, and corpus phenomena.

Terms typically offered:

This course is not typically offered at any campus during any term.

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3552. Laboratory in Sensation and Perception

Area IV Lab

(215) Three credits. Two 3-hour laboratory periods. Prerequisite: PSYC 2100Q or 2100WQ, and PSYC 3501, which may be taken concurrently.

Techniques for the study of sensory capacities and perceptual processes.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Fall, Spring Not typically offered
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Stamford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Waterbury Not typically offered Not typically offered

Till Frank (Storrs)

No course description available.

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3600. Social-Organizational Psychology

Area IV Lecture

(282) Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 2600; Recommended preparation: PSYC 2700. Social psychological phenomena in the workplace.

Social perceptions, personality, stress, work-related attitudes, motivation, team decision-making and effectiveness, leadership and influence, organizational culture.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Varies Not typically offered
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Stamford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Waterbury Not typically offered Not typically offered

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3600W. Social-Organizational Psychology

Area IV Lecture

(282) Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 2600; ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011; Recommended preparation: PSYC 2700.

Terms typically offered:

This course is not typically offered at any campus during any term and is currently archived from the catalog.

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3601. Human Factors Design

Area III and Area IV Lecture

(278) Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 1100.

Application of information about human abilities and limitations to the design of systems, products, tools, computer interfaces, tasks, jobs, and environments for safe, comfortable and effective human use.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Varies Not typically offered
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Stamford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Waterbury Not typically offered Not typically offered

Robert Henning (Storrs)

The main goals of this course of study are for you to first learn how human factors/ergonomics (HF/E) principles can be used in the design, analysis, and development of systems for safe, comfortable and efficient human use. A group project provides opportunities for you to apply HF/E design principles to a real system. Some examples of past group projects include developing formal recommendations for improving the following: the design of study spaces in the Homer Babbidge Library, the user interface of the CLAS Academic Services Center, the user interfaces for HuskyCT and PeopleSoft, access to bus route information, use of recycling containers on campus, the dorm room reservation system, campus signage, and the layout of the student gym. A behavioral systems-oriented model, Behavioral Cybernetics, is introduced early in the course along with general HF/E systems principles. This helps promote an understanding of how human performance usually depends on the design of the system that humans are a part of. You are also introduced to a number of established human factors methods and tools for planning user-centered design efforts in the development of new systems, or for the evaluation and redesign of existing systems.

  • Format: Lecture; group discussion; group projects
  • Requirements: Short essay and multiple-choice exams; group project equating to 30% of your final grade
  • Text/Materials: text; paperback book; handouts on HuskyCT

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3601W. Human Factors Design

Area III and Area IV Lecture

(278W) Prerequisite: PSYC 1100; ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

Terms typically offered:

This course is not typically offered at any campus during any term and is currently archived from the catalog.

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3670. Current Topics in Industrial/Organizational Psychology

Area IV Lecture

(280) Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 2600 or 3601 or instructor consent. May be repeated for credit with a change of topic.

Terms typically offered:

This course is not typically offered at any campus during any term.

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3670W. Current Topics in Industrial/Organizational Psychology

Area IV Lecture

(280W) Prerequisite: PSYC 2600 or 3601 or instructor consent; ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

Terms typically offered:

This course is not typically offered at any campus during any term.

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3750. Laboratory in Social Psychology

Area IV Lab

(242) Three credits. Two class periods and one 2-hour research/laboratory period. Prerequisite: PSYC 2100Q or 2100WQ or STAT 1100; PSYC 2700; and consent of instructor.

Methods and techniques of research in social psychology. Supervised research investigations.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Varies Not typically offered
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Stamford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Waterbury Not typically offered Not typically offered

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3750W. Laboratory in Social Psychology

Area IV Lab

(242W) Prerequisite: PSYC 2100Q or 2100WQ or STAT 1100; PSYC 2700; ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011; and consent of instructor.

Terms typically offered:

This course is not typically offered at any campus during any term and is currently archived from the catalog.

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3770. Current Topics in Social Psychology

Area IV Lecture

(241) Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 2700 and consent of instructor. With a change in content, this course may be repeated for credit.

Selected topics (e.g., social influence, person perception, pro-social behavior) vary with each offering.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Varies Not typically offered
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Stamford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Waterbury Not typically offered Not typically offered

Felicia Pratto (Storrs) | Social Psychology of Power

No course description available.

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3770W. Current Topics in Social Psychology

Area IV Lecture

(241W) Prerequisite: PSYC 2700 and consent of instructor; ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

Terms typically offered:

This course is not typically offered at any campus during any term and is currently archived from the catalog.

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3880. Field Experience

Not approved for usage on the psycholigcal sciences plan of study

(294) Credits, not to exceed six per semester, and hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: PSYC 1100, and PSYC 1101 or 1103; open only with consent of instructor. With a change in content, this course may be repeated for credit. Students taking this course will be assigned a final grade of S (satisfactory) or U (unsatisfactory).

Supervised field work in clinical, community, or organizational settings.

Terms typically offered:

By arrangement. See the PSYC 3880 (Field Experience) page for more information on enrolling in this course.

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3883. Foreign Study

Area IV Lecture

(290) Credits and hours by arrangement. Prerequi­site: Consent of Department Head or advisor may be required prior to the student’s departure. May be repeated for credit.

Special topics taken in a foreign study program.

Terms typically offered:

By arrangement. For course accreditation of psychology education abroad (formerly study abroad) courses lacking an alternative UConn equivalent. See the Transfer Credit page for more information on earning psychology credit while studying abroad.

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3884. Seminar in Psychology

Area IV Lecture

(295) Three credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 1100, and PSYC 1101 or 1103 and consent of instructor. With a change in content, may be repeated for credit.

Recent developments in psychology. Topics vary with each offering.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Varies Not typically offered
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Varies Not typically offered
Stamford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Waterbury Not typically offered Not typically offered

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3885. Special Topics

Area IV Lecture

(298) Credits and hours by arrangement. With a change in content, may be repeated for credit. Prerequisites and recommended preparation vary.

Terms typically offered:

Campus Academic Year Summer
Storrs Not typically offered Not typically offered
Avery Point Not typically offered Not typically offered
Hartford Not typically offered Not typically offered
Stamford Spring Not typically offered
Waterbury Not typically offered Not typically offered

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3889. Undergraduate Research

Research

(297) Credits, not to exceed six per semester, and hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: Open only with consent of instructor. Recommended preparation: PSYC 2100Q or 2100WQ. With a change in content, this course may be repeated for credit.

Participant activities related to research.

Terms typically offered:

By arrangement. See the PSYC 3889 (Undergraduate Research) page for more information on enrolling in this course.

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3899. Independent Study

Research

(297) Credits, not to exceed six per semester, and hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: Open only with consent of instructor. Recommended preparation: PSYC 2100Q or 2100WQ. With a change in content, this course may be repeated for credit.

Participant activities related to research.

Terms typically offered:

By arrangement. See the PSYC 3899 (Independent Study) page for more information on enrolling in this course.

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4197W. Senior Thesis in Psychology

Research

(296W) Three credits. Hours by arrangement. Prereq­uisite: Three credits of PSYC 3889 or PSYC 3899; ENGL 1010 or 1011 (296W) Three credits. Hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: Three credits of PSYC 3889 or PSYC 3899; ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011; open only to Honors students with consent of instructor and Department Head or 2011; open only to Honors stu­dents with consent of instructor and Department Head.

Terms typically offered:

By arrangement. See the PSYC 4197W (Senior Thesis in Psychology) page for more information on enrolling in this course.

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